stringbook

World on a string.
Apr 13 '14
Keri Russell on Season Two of The Americans — Vulture By Denise Martin February 2, 2014

“I’m not really summer-blockbuster-movie material. My boobs aren’t big enough for that,” she says. “When Matt [Reeves, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes director] called, I was like, ‘You mean I’d be doing these emotional scenes with grown men in unitards pretending to be apes?’ But Andy Serkis [who plays lead ape Caesar] and I had so many gut-wrenching crying scenes. The unitards weren’t a problem.”

Keri Russell on Season Two of The Americans — Vulture
By Denise Martin
February 2, 2014

“I’m not really summer-blockbuster-movie material. My boobs aren’t big enough for that,” she says. “When Matt [Reeves, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes director] called, I was like, ‘You mean I’d be doing these emotional scenes with grown men in unitards pretending to be apes?’ But Andy Serkis [who plays lead ape Caesar] and I had so many gut-wrenching crying scenes. The unitards weren’t a problem.”

4 notes Tags: keri russell

Apr 12 '14
The Library’s Extremely Useful Predecessor - Streetscapes - NYTimes.com By Christopher Gray January 20, 2011

As its dingy marble facade is cleaned and repaired, the New York Public Library at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street has been shrouded at times under gauzy, other-worldly construction netting, making it appear almost as if the library was not there. Which, in the 19th century, it wasn’t; the land was occupied by the huge, brooding Egyptian-style Croton Reservoir, built in 1842 as the focal point of the city’s first central water system … On opening day, July 4, 1842, more than 20,000 people visited the 25-million-gallon reservoir, each receiving a glass of Croton water, with ice. At a City Hall picnic Gov. William H. Seward announced that although yesterday New York had been “a dusty trading mart, unattractive and unadorned, today the pure mountain stream gushes through its streets and sparkles in its squares.” The reservoir was designed to provide 24 gallons a day for every one of the 600,000 people living in the city. 
The New York Tribune described the provision of the water as a “mission of mercy” to New Yorkers, but it was mercy at a price. There was no charge for water at the 600 public taps. But direct hookups were meant to produce revenue. By 1844, 7,100 private houses were paying $10 apiece annually, with total receipts from all building subscribers of $130,000. The annual interest on the construction cost was about $800,000.

The Library’s Extremely Useful Predecessor - Streetscapes - NYTimes.com
By Christopher Gray
January 20, 2011

As its dingy marble facade is cleaned and repaired, the New York Public Library at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street has been shrouded at times under gauzy, other-worldly construction netting, making it appear almost as if the library was not there. Which, in the 19th century, it wasn’t; the land was occupied by the huge, brooding Egyptian-style Croton Reservoir, built in 1842 as the focal point of the city’s first central water system … On opening day, July 4, 1842, more than 20,000 people visited the 25-million-gallon reservoir, each receiving a glass of Croton water, with ice. At a City Hall picnic Gov. William H. Seward announced that although yesterday New York had been “a dusty trading mart, unattractive and unadorned, today the pure mountain stream gushes through its streets and sparkles in its squares.” The reservoir was designed to provide 24 gallons a day for every one of the 600,000 people living in the city. 

The New York Tribune described the provision of the water as a “mission of mercy” to New Yorkers, but it was mercy at a price. There was no charge for water at the 600 public taps. But direct hookups were meant to produce revenue. By 1844, 7,100 private houses were paying $10 apiece annually, with total receipts from all building subscribers of $130,000. The annual interest on the construction cost was about $800,000.

Tags: New York City Architecture history urban studies urban planning new york public library

Apr 11 '14
lace567made:

Title : Mona Martin Margiela 
Created by : LACE567
Medium : adobe photoshop

lace567made:

Title : Mona Martin Margiela 

Created by : LACE567

Medium : adobe photoshop

14,717 notes (via swim-class & lace567made)Tags: art mixed media

Apr 10 '14
It’s Party Popple! (via The San Francisco Globe)

It’s Party Popple! (via The San Francisco Globe)

Tags: popples

Apr 10 '14

myladyfire:

Ghost rolled in some sidewalk chalk.

297,272 notes (via wiigipedia & myladyfire)Tags: puppies

Apr 8 '14
When women succeed, America succeeds.
— President Barack Obama Tuesday in remarks to commemorate Equal Pay Day and urge Congress to pass more legislation to close the pay gender gap. (via nbcnews)

(Source: NBCNews.com)

1,767 notes (via smartgirlsattheparty & nbcnews)Tags: obama feministy

Apr 7 '14
fastcompany:

"The perfect Tweet length was right around 100 characters.” - The Proven Ideal Length Of Every Tweet, Facebook Post, And Headline Online

fastcompany:

"The perfect Tweet length was right around 100 characters.”The Proven Ideal Length Of Every Tweet, Facebook Post, And Headline Online

1,182 notes (via fastcompany)Tags: Social media internet internet culture Twitter facebook language infographics

Mar 31 '14

Tags: television internet

Mar 25 '14

129 notes (via theatlantic)Tags: language geography video

Mar 19 '14

Old Man Eating Alone in a Chinese Restaurant : Billy Collins

Billy Collins

I am glad I resisted the temptation,
if it was a temptation when I was young,
to write a poem about an old man
eating alone at a corner table in a Chinese restaurant.

I would have gotten it all wrong
thinking: the poor bastard, not a friend in the world
and with only a book for a companion.
He’ll probably pay the bill out of a change purse.

So glad I waited all these decades
to record how hot and sour the hot and sour
soup is here at Chang’s this afternoon
and how cold the Chinese beer in a frosted glass.

And my book –– José Saramago’s Blindness
as it turns out –– is so absorbing that I look up
from its escalating horrors only
when I am stunned by one of his gleaming sentences.

And I should mention the light
that falls through the big windows this time of the day
italicizing everything it touches ––
the plates and teapots, the immaculate tablecloths, 

as well as the soft brown hair of the waitress
in the white blouse and short black skirt,
the one who is smiling now as she bears a cup of rice
and shredded beef with garlic to my favorite table in the corner.

(Source: poetenladen.de)

6 notes Tags: poetry billy collins

Mar 17 '14

Tags: reading internet content

Mar 11 '14

fastcodesign:

Think Your Apartment Is Small? Check Out These Super-Tiny Hong Kong Houses

Only big enough for a bunk bed surrounded by wire walls, these minuscule dwellings aren’t a project in urban microhousing. They’re the result of poor workers trying to find a place to live in the city’s booming real estate market.

More> Co.Exist

414 notes (via fastcompany & fastcodesign)Tags: urban studies hong kong photography

Mar 6 '14
Million Square Foot Artwork in the Sahara Still Visible After 17 Years - TwistedSifterMarch 5, 2014
Desert Breath is a land art project created by the D.A.ST. Arteam. The team was founded in 1995 by Danae Stratou (installation artist), Alexandra Stratou (industrial designer & architect) and Stella Constantinides (architect) for the purpose of creating this specific project. 
The project is rooted in the team’s mutual desire to work in the desert. For D.A.ST. the desert was a place where one experiences infinity. They were addressing the desert as a state of mind, a landscape of the mind. The point of departure was the conical form, the natural formation of the sand as a material … The work functions on two different levels in terms of viewpoint: from above as a visual image, and from the ground, walking the spiral pathway, a physical experience … The construction of Desert Breath was completed in March 1997 and still exists today. Although it is slowly disintegrating, it stands as an instrument to measure the passage of time. You can see the artwork as it looks today on Google Maps/Earth by entering the following coordinates: 27°22’50.10″N, 33°37’54.62″E

Million Square Foot Artwork in the Sahara Still Visible After 17 Years - TwistedSifter
March 5, 2014

Desert Breath is a land art project created by the D.A.ST. Arteam. The team was founded in 1995 by Danae Stratou (installation artist), Alexandra Stratou (industrial designer & architect) and Stella Constantinides (architect) for the purpose of creating this specific project. 

The project is rooted in the team’s mutual desire to work in the desert. For D.A.ST. the desert was a place where one experiences infinity. They were addressing the desert as a state of mind, a landscape of the mind. The point of departure was the conical form, the natural formation of the sand as a material … The work functions on two different levels in terms of viewpoint: from above as a visual image, and from the ground, walking the spiral pathway, a physical experience … The construction of Desert Breath was completed in March 1997 and still exists today. Although it is slowly disintegrating, it stands as an instrument to measure the passage of time. You can see the artwork as it looks today on Google Maps/Earth by entering the following coordinates: 27°22’50.10″N, 33°37’54.62″E

2 notes Tags: desert breath art installation egypt photography art

Mar 6 '14

emilyonthewall:

Call the MidWitches

Every fandom must have a Harry Potter AU. I don’t make the rules.

29 notes (via emilyonthewall)Tags: call the midwife Harry Potter Illustration

Mar 2 '14
The Dinosaur Pet Guide by John Conway
The JOHNCONWAY.co, purveyors of fine dinosaurian pet portraiture, is pleased to bring you The Dinosaur Pet Guide, informing you on the pleasures and pitfalls of today’s common dinosaurian pets.

The Dinosaur Pet Guide by John Conway

The JOHNCONWAY.co, purveyors of fine dinosaurian pet portraiture, is pleased to bring you The Dinosaur Pet Guide, informing you on the pleasures and pitfalls of today’s common dinosaurian pets.

Tags: dinosaurs john conway illustration pets